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April 17, 2016

Marriage Contract Poll Redux

An anguished Hye Soo looks heavenward as she pleads that she still has a lot to do in lifeRemember that poll I posted when the Marriage Contract plot and casting was first announced?

As you can probably tell, I am a bit cynical about plots that capitalize on extreme situations. However, Marriage Contract has earned honestly every tear and smile it has wrung from me, and there have been plenty of both.

With only 3 episodes left, it’s time to revisit the poll.

How Will They Save Her?

  1. MISDIAGNOSIS. She was never sick in the first place.
  2. SPONTANEOUS RECOVERY. It’s a miracle! Love conquers all!
  3. A DONOR APPEARS. A relative she never knew she had!
  4. THEY WON’T. But we’re OK with it, because she becomes a sympathetic ghost watching over her family.
  5. He makes enough money to send her to Duke University for the new treatment that has cured people with terminal brain cancer.

We can throw out the misdiagnosis option. That ship has sailed.

Ditto for the donor solution. Stop laughing at me – how could I know the affected organ was her brain?! The initial announcements weren’t that specific. And even so, if this was a horror drama… But since it’s melodrama, I think brain transplants are out.

As for resolution number 4, 절대! Don’t ever bring that up again.

Most interesting is the final option on the poll, which was not one of my originals, but was added by a viewer. That’s my favorite, though I wouldn’t say no to a spontaneous remission either.

Going to America is a solution for so many things in Kdrama that it’s an awful cliche, but Marriage Contract has successfully overridden many cliches already. I’m sure they could make it stick. And LSJ just spoke English in episode 11, so there you go.

Meet you at the airport.


Related:
Lee Seo Jin to Star in Upcoming Drama – Poll
Marriage Contract Off to a Strong Start
Marriage Contract – I Do
KDrama Word of the Day: Bison (Hand Rubbing)
Dramas with Lee Seo Jin

March 21, 2016

Marriage Contract - I Do

Screenshot of Viki ratings for drama Marriage Contract sowing a 9.7 average out of 286 ratingsI’m continuing to find plenty to like in MBC’s new weekend drama, Marriage Contract. And I’m not alone. As of episode 6, broadcast ratings are holding steady or increasing, and the Viki rating has edged up another tenth of a star to 9.7.

Not only do the tireless volunteer subbers English-caption episodes within hours of receiving them (사랑해요, Mother’s Love team!), but subtitles are also available in 13 other languages as well.

I’ve had some problems with the ads on Viki. They break in to the most intense scenes mid-sentence, repeat the same ad 4 times in a row in one commercial break, or hang and crash the flash plugin so that I have to reload. Talk about killing the mood!

I’m grateful that there are sponsors, and I understand how necessary they are, but regular ads are one thing, and having the whole viewing experience disrupted by broken ads is another. Hopefully Viki will get this straightened out soon.

Meanwhile, I’m seeing no ads on DramaFever, but I have to wait until Monday instead of watching over the weekend. TIP: If the new eps don’t appear to be posted yet on DF on a Monday, check the dropdown episode list in the player.

Marriage Contract is checking all of the mandatory KDrama boxes: Romantic wound-tending, piggyback rides and frequent food porn. Today I’ll give propers to some of the supporting characters, who are often unsung.

Kim Young Pil looks outraged as his father accuses him of failing in his romantic relationshipsInitially, I felt some sympathy for 형 (Kim Young Pil). One day, he’s a rich man’s only son. The next, he’s sharing both of his parents with an illegitimate half-brother who’s brighter, more charming, and looks like Lee Seo Jin. Ouch.

But tough as that might be, and mean as his father is, it’s hard to empathize with a 40 year-old man who throws hissy fits like a toddler at naptime. Are we seeing his ugly side because he’s about to do something nasty?

MORE…

March 13, 2016

Marriage Contract Off to a Strong Start

I’m 4 episodes into Marriage Contract, one quarter of the way through the new MBC drama starring Lee Seo Jin and Uee. It was promoted as a melodrama, not my favorite genre, so my hopes weren’t high. I’m happy to report that it is better than I expected.

Hye Soo and Ji Hoon exchange a meaningful glance in the front seat of his car after she prevents his mother from killing herself
Uee is new to me, but she has a long history in Kpop, and quite a few dramas under her belt as well. Therefore, I was surprised by her blank, mannikin-like persona during the drama’s press conference. It was hard to picture her as an expressive actress, or even as a real girl.

However, it turns out that there is much more to Kim Yu Jin than meets the eye. She brings a rare dimensionality to the down-on-her-luck-and-desperate spunky heroine. This is even more of an accomplishment when you consider that the upper half of her face is obscured by her hair in many of her most important scenes.

Shin Rin Ah gives Uee 2 thumbs up for a delicious meal
Uee is a devoted mother to Shin Rin Ah, and their scenes together are touching. Although her luck is relentlessly awful, and she has shell-shocked moments when she receives bad news, we never see Uee surrender to the despair that is so often the precursor to a loveless marriage in Kdrama. She puts up with a lot when she must, but she is no martyr. Push her too far, and she pushes back. Whatever others may think about her life, she never doubts her own values or perceptions. In her introverted, understated way, she holds up and keeps moving under unbelievable stresses.

Lee Seo Jin is in his element, in a role that shows off his impressive range. His character is a major jerk from the opening scene,* leaving plenty of room for transformative growth. It’s risky to start off a drama this way. Without depth and complexity, an unpleasant leading man can turn viewers off. Not a problem with LSJ, though. The underlying humanity of his characters always shines through, no matter how badly they behave.
Lee Seo Jin walks down a hotel corridor grinning smugly and ignoring the calls of the woman he has just dumped from the doorway behind himLee Seo Jin's concerned face is reflected in the window as he looks into the hospital room where his mother is hooked up to monitors and IVs


I’m looking forward to learning more of Ji Hoon’s backstory, particularly about his former life as a musician. MORE…

August 20, 2015

A Korean Drama Wedding

Logos for viki and soompi enclosed in a heartBig news in kdramaland – mega-forum soompi and streaming service viki are getting hitched. Sure, they know a lot of the same people, and share a lot of the same interests, but will it last?

Only time can tell…

November 25, 2014

KDrama Word of the Day: Kajok (Family)

Kajok (가족) is our KDrama word for today, and a very central word to Korean drama (and life) it is. The first syllable, kah, is pronounced like the “co” in “cot.” The second syllable is closer to “joke” than to “jock,” bearing in mind also that the final vowel is barely touched upon (which is why you may see it Romanized as kajog or gajog).
A Korean kajok consisting of a man, woman and baby sit in a park with a river and city buildings in the background


In spite of the importance of kajok to just about every Korean drama ever made, the word itself is not heard all that often. Maybe this is because dramatic conflicts often revolve around a particular person or persons in the 가족.

I am debating whether to include words for different family members in our KDrama words series. There are many helpful webpages for these terms already. They can be a lot more complicated than their English equivalents. For example, you can’t just speak of your “brother” in Korean, as there are different words for older and younger siblings. In addition, the word for a woman’s brother is different from the word for a man’s brother!

Words for other kajok members are similarly specific. Terms vary depending on whether they refer to father’s or mother’s relatives. Birth order can also be a factor. Here’s a pretty inclusive page on some of the distinctions. Notice how long it is!

Korean screenwriters depend heavily on these terms to identify relationships between characters. Korean-speaking audiences learn immediately who characters are when they call each other “big brother,” “father’s sister,” “mother’s mother,” etc.

However, these crucial identifying titles are often dropped from subtitles and replaced with personal names. This leaves non-Korean-speaking viewers totally in the dark about how characters are related to one other. We figure it out eventually, but may have missed many key nuances in dialogue by that time.

To complicate matters even further, unrelated people may address each other using family terms. We see co-workers calling older colleagues with whom they are friendly hyeong/oppa and noona/eonni all the time. It is even trickier when friends call each other by sibling terms, since the informality of their relationships makes it easy to mistake them for actual siblings.

I was extremely confused by this when I first started watching Korean dramas. I assumed (not unreasonably, right?) that a child who called an adult man 아저씨 (uncle) was in fact his niece. Hah, if only it were so simple! In fact, characters frequently call total strangers mother, father, aunt, uncle, grandfather or grandmother. And don’t even get me started on a woman’s use of the word for big brother to address her boyfriend!

So, drama viewers, arm yourself with a comprehensive list of relationship terms like the one linked above. Keep it handy when characters are making their first appearance. Careful listening at the beginning of a drama can save you a lot of confusion later on!


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November 24, 2014

KDrama Word of the Day: Yeoreum (Summer)

Yeoreum (여름) brings our Koreans seasons series full circle. You’ll remember the ㅕfrom 겨울. The pronunciation is yuh-room (or yaw-room), with a slightly rolled R (여름 is sometimes Romanized as yeoleum).
Bright green rice grass leaves

RICE PLANTS

Korea has monsoon summers (장마 jangma – rainy season), with heavy rain and high humidity. There is nothing comparable in the U.S. For specifics, check out this page. For those of us in the still-non-metric U.S., it’s nice to have temperature charts that include a Fahrenheit column.

I hope you have enjoyed our season miniseries. Korean seasons appear frequently in Korean drama titles, and in all genres of Korean music, from Kpop to folk to trot, and beyond.

This is Thanksgiving week in the U.S., so I’ll try to keep our word selections for the rest of the week seasonal. About 1/2 of mihansa’s readers are in east and southeast Asia. For their benefit, here is what Thanksgiving week in the U.S. is like: Although Thanksgiving Day isn’t until Thursday, travel has already begun, as people pack airports and highways to spend the holiday with families. Most businesses will be closed on Thanksgiving Day, but many people will have the following day day off work, too, so “Black Friday” becomes a day of major sales and intense Christmas shopping. Bad weather, which is common in late November, can complicate matters as everyone returns home.


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November 23, 2014

KDrama Word of the Day: Bom (Spring)

Bom (봄) is our next Korean season. It is also Romanized as pom, a closer, but less common, English equivalent to the Korean pronunciation. The Korean word for spring rhymes with “dome.”
A twig of cherry blossoms
KDrama likes to associate bom with cherry blossoms and 애인 (ae-een – lovers). However, the trees are controversial in Korea, due to their association with Japan and the Japanese occupation. Cutting down cherry trees planted during that period was at one time symbolic of taking back Korea. Planting cherry species that are native to Korea has become something of a compromise. You will notice that words for other spring flowers appear on this list of Korean words associated with spring, but no cherry blossoms.

Even less welcome in spring are storms of yellow sand (황사 – hwangsa). These storms blow in from deserts of northern China and Mongolia, picking up a heavy load of toxic pollutants along the way. When inhaled, the dust can be seriously injurious to health. If you see a street scene with pedestrians wearing particle masks during bom, that is probably the reason.

Note ㅁ, the M-ish letter in Korean. In small type or handwriting, this letter can be difficult to distinguish from ㅇ, which we discussed yesterday. Watch for squared corners.


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November 22, 2014

KDrama Word of the Day: Winter (Kyeoul)

Kyeoul (겨울), winter is our KDrama word for today. Does that string of vowels look familiar? You have seen it before in the name of South Korea’s capital and largest city, Seoul (서울).
Stacked kimchi jars in a snowy valley next to a sign in Korean
You’ll see that the second letter is similar but different in these two words. The ㅓ in Seoul has only one left-facing flag on the vertical, while the ㅕin kyeoul has two. A second flag on a vowel, whether on a horizontal or vertical bar, gives it a Y sound at the beginning. So ㅓ (in Seoul) is pronounced uh or aw, while ㅕ(in kyeoul) is pronounced yuh or yaw. Many Korean vowels have these two forms, which are considered to be two separate letters.

Moving on to the second syllable, in both words, it begins with ㅜ, the “oo” U-letter we talked about in the last post. Kyeoul is pronounced kyuh-ool or kyaw-ool, while Seoul is pronounced suh-ool or saw-ool (NOT “sole,” as most Americans pronounce it). Even though both words have two syllables, the syllables are blended together rather than enunciated separately, so it sounds more like a syllable-and-a-half. You can hear the pronunciation for kyeoul and many other winter-related words on this page.

But wait, you may be thinking. The second syllable doesn’t begin with ㅜ, it begins with ㅇ. Well, yes and no. ㅇ has a dual nature. In theory, Korean syllables must begin with a consonant. When they don’t, ㅇ stands in for the consonant, as a placeholder with no sound. At the end of a syllable, however, ㅇ has an “ng” sound.

Have you learned Hangeul yet? You may have some free time next week, so check out these games:


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November 20, 2014

KDrama Word of the Day: Fall (Kaeul)

Fall (가을) is 우리 Kdrama Word for today. Korea is definitely a 4-season country, with chilly winters, monsoon summers, fall color, and spring blossoms. You may also see 가을 Romanized as gaeul, but kaeul is a better phonetic spelling. The vowel syllable is partly absorbed into the first syllable, so kah-eul sounds like one syllable with a dragged-out first vowel, rather than two distinct syllables.
Close up photo of oak leaves turned red in fall
Note that the Hangeul letters ㅡ and ㅜ have different U-sounds.
ㅡ is usually Romanized as “eu,” but it is not, strictly speaking, an English-language sound, so it is difficult to Romanize accurately. The English words “eu” appears in are typically loan words from French. The “eu” is often pronounced “oo” in the English version (which is the sound of Hangeul letter ㅜ). Example: entrepreneur. The “eu” sound is formed just inside the lips, while “oo” comes from further back.

What’s a loan word, you may ask? A loan word is a word borrowed from another language (and usually changed a bit along the way). English is full of French loan words and phrases. Some are obviously French, such as deja vu, faux pas, cachet, nouveau riche, hors d’oeuvre, fait accompli, coup d’etat, dossier, memoir, rapport and restaurant. Others are everday words we may not think of as French – mayonnaise, unique, ambulance, denim, pioneer, detour, corduroy, menu, dentist, portrait, route, soup, zest, bicycle, publicity, and salvage, to name just a few. Watch out for words in Korean that seem like loan words of English words that are themselves loan words from another language. Sometimes the Korean word is a loan word of the original word, not the English version.

Somewhere between 50-70% of Korean words are loan words from Chinese, due to a long history of military and economic domination from the west. For this reason, Chinese speakers may be able to understand a great deal of Korean without studying the language. Korean also has many English loan words, especially for technology (like 핸드폰), and other aspects of modern urban life (like 뉴스).

And then there are cognates. Cognates are similar-sounding words in related languages that come from the same root. For example, I am able to understand quite a lot of words in Spanish that I have never studied, because they sound similar to the English words. You have to watch out though, because cognates have sometimes evolved different meanings in different languages, even though they sound similar and came from the same parent word.

And finally, there is Konglish. These days, the term is generally used to describe Korean loan words from English. However, I have read that it originally referred to the clever use of Korean words that sounded like English words to convey a double meaning in English and Korean.


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November 19, 2014

KDrama Words of the Day: Hanok | Hanbok | Haengbok

Hanok (한옥) begins our trio of somewhat similar-sounding KDrama words for today. A 한옥 is a traditional Korean house, as we have all seen in sageuk. The pronunciation of the first syllable is hah, and the o sounds like oak, so “hah-noke” rhymes with awoke.
A well-kept hanok house in the country with a rocky mountain wall behind itThis might be a good time to talk about final consonants in Korean words. English speakers enunciate last consonants completely, often finishing up with a little puff of air (while paying attention to the inside of your mouth, say: cat. Feel it?). For Koreans, on the other hand, the final consonant is barely hinted at, and sometimes not audible at all, unless the next word begins with a vowel.

A hanok house has sliding doors, heated floors, compact bedrooms and is usually all on one story. You can read more about regional differences in hanok design here.

A man and woman wearing Joseon hanbok stand under a tree talkingOur next word, hanbok (한복) is also related to Korean traditions, of dress. We have all seen hanbok in drama, whether historical or set in the present. They turn up on men, women and children, at weddings, at bowing ceremonies (because managing that in a full length skirt shows you really mean it!), and on children at birthday parties. We also see hanbok on pansori singers and traditional Korean dancers. Korean modern styles have been influenced by hanbok in obvious ways (short sweaters with long sleeves, for example), and the influence is beginning to circulate outside of Korea.

Last but not least is haengbok (행복), which is Korean for happy. Haengbok is pronounced pretty much the way it is Romanized, for once! As with 사랑, 결혼, and 이혼, add 하다 to 행복 for the verb form 행복하다 (haengbokhada), “to be happy.”

To top off our post today, we have a charming video of 해피 young Koreans dancing to the Pharrell Williams song, “Happy.”


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